Javos Ironworks
Work and Workings from the Ironworks.
Javos Ironworks
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faramforge:

Jewelry Viking hammer and 3.7 lb cross peen.I forged these from 1045
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hammer-2-anvil:

My very first Rubix Twist.
-H2A
hammer-2-anvil:

My very first Rubix Twist.
-H2A
hammer-2-anvil:

My very first Rubix Twist.
-H2A
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alecsteeleblacksmith:

Going freakayyyy #forged #squish #blacksmith #hammer #steel
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dmpipes:

Today was all about this massive carving gouge here.. 
The steel is stamped “JAMES CAM SHEFFIELD” on the inside, and “CAST STEEL” on the outside. 
James Cam was a tool steel manufacturer from 1781 - 1838. “Cast steel” from Sheffield was among the very best steels from that era, and it still holds true today.
I acquired the rusted gouge missing the handle and in pretty bad over-all shape. I cleaned it up, reground the bevel to 20°, and fitted a proper american hickory handle with leather washers. The bevel was then honed to a shaving sharp edge on diamond plates. 
I’ve never even seen a reference to a gouge this large, it is an exceedingly rare piece of woodworking history. 
With only 200+/- years behind this tool, it’s amazing to think of the projects that it has helped complete… and the hundreds of years of future life that still remain…
dmpipes:

Today was all about this massive carving gouge here.. 
The steel is stamped “JAMES CAM SHEFFIELD” on the inside, and “CAST STEEL” on the outside. 
James Cam was a tool steel manufacturer from 1781 - 1838. “Cast steel” from Sheffield was among the very best steels from that era, and it still holds true today.
I acquired the rusted gouge missing the handle and in pretty bad over-all shape. I cleaned it up, reground the bevel to 20°, and fitted a proper american hickory handle with leather washers. The bevel was then honed to a shaving sharp edge on diamond plates. 
I’ve never even seen a reference to a gouge this large, it is an exceedingly rare piece of woodworking history. 
With only 200+/- years behind this tool, it’s amazing to think of the projects that it has helped complete… and the hundreds of years of future life that still remain…
dmpipes:

Today was all about this massive carving gouge here.. 
The steel is stamped “JAMES CAM SHEFFIELD” on the inside, and “CAST STEEL” on the outside. 
James Cam was a tool steel manufacturer from 1781 - 1838. “Cast steel” from Sheffield was among the very best steels from that era, and it still holds true today.
I acquired the rusted gouge missing the handle and in pretty bad over-all shape. I cleaned it up, reground the bevel to 20°, and fitted a proper american hickory handle with leather washers. The bevel was then honed to a shaving sharp edge on diamond plates. 
I’ve never even seen a reference to a gouge this large, it is an exceedingly rare piece of woodworking history. 
With only 200+/- years behind this tool, it’s amazing to think of the projects that it has helped complete… and the hundreds of years of future life that still remain…
dmpipes:

Today was all about this massive carving gouge here.. 
The steel is stamped “JAMES CAM SHEFFIELD” on the inside, and “CAST STEEL” on the outside. 
James Cam was a tool steel manufacturer from 1781 - 1838. “Cast steel” from Sheffield was among the very best steels from that era, and it still holds true today.
I acquired the rusted gouge missing the handle and in pretty bad over-all shape. I cleaned it up, reground the bevel to 20°, and fitted a proper american hickory handle with leather washers. The bevel was then honed to a shaving sharp edge on diamond plates. 
I’ve never even seen a reference to a gouge this large, it is an exceedingly rare piece of woodworking history. 
With only 200+/- years behind this tool, it’s amazing to think of the projects that it has helped complete… and the hundreds of years of future life that still remain…
dmpipes:

Today was all about this massive carving gouge here.. 
The steel is stamped “JAMES CAM SHEFFIELD” on the inside, and “CAST STEEL” on the outside. 
James Cam was a tool steel manufacturer from 1781 - 1838. “Cast steel” from Sheffield was among the very best steels from that era, and it still holds true today.
I acquired the rusted gouge missing the handle and in pretty bad over-all shape. I cleaned it up, reground the bevel to 20°, and fitted a proper american hickory handle with leather washers. The bevel was then honed to a shaving sharp edge on diamond plates. 
I’ve never even seen a reference to a gouge this large, it is an exceedingly rare piece of woodworking history. 
With only 200+/- years behind this tool, it’s amazing to think of the projects that it has helped complete… and the hundreds of years of future life that still remain…
dmpipes:

Today was all about this massive carving gouge here.. 
The steel is stamped “JAMES CAM SHEFFIELD” on the inside, and “CAST STEEL” on the outside. 
James Cam was a tool steel manufacturer from 1781 - 1838. “Cast steel” from Sheffield was among the very best steels from that era, and it still holds true today.
I acquired the rusted gouge missing the handle and in pretty bad over-all shape. I cleaned it up, reground the bevel to 20°, and fitted a proper american hickory handle with leather washers. The bevel was then honed to a shaving sharp edge on diamond plates. 
I’ve never even seen a reference to a gouge this large, it is an exceedingly rare piece of woodworking history. 
With only 200+/- years behind this tool, it’s amazing to think of the projects that it has helped complete… and the hundreds of years of future life that still remain…
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the-ghost-darkness:


the ghost and the darkness
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cjforge:

Handmade hinges in progress.www.facebook.com/CJForgeBlacksmith
#blacksmith #forged #hinges
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redforgeworks:

Late night tool-making
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cloverdaleforge:

Brought the sample rail to the booth. #blacksmith #wff2014 #railing
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rashystreakers:

Bird on a branch.
This is a combo steel and copper. Now that it is finished I see I still need a lot of work on my soldering skills. Well, this is how I get better, practice!
I may try another one made of solid copper and thicker stock. Instead of cutting out the copper leaves I will forge them from bar copper so I have better stability overall.
I do like the bird. It’s pretty.
rashystreakers:

Bird on a branch.
This is a combo steel and copper. Now that it is finished I see I still need a lot of work on my soldering skills. Well, this is how I get better, practice!
I may try another one made of solid copper and thicker stock. Instead of cutting out the copper leaves I will forge them from bar copper so I have better stability overall.
I do like the bird. It’s pretty.
rashystreakers:

Bird on a branch.
This is a combo steel and copper. Now that it is finished I see I still need a lot of work on my soldering skills. Well, this is how I get better, practice!
I may try another one made of solid copper and thicker stock. Instead of cutting out the copper leaves I will forge them from bar copper so I have better stability overall.
I do like the bird. It’s pretty.
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rashystreakers:

While I’m at it I should show off the progress I made on this viking style rail spike axe I worked on last night. It was a real pain to forge weld the carbon bit on this beast. But I’ve got it all together. Later tonight I hope to heat treat the three latest axes I’ve been working on. My fingers are crossed!
rashystreakers:

While I’m at it I should show off the progress I made on this viking style rail spike axe I worked on last night. It was a real pain to forge weld the carbon bit on this beast. But I’ve got it all together. Later tonight I hope to heat treat the three latest axes I’ve been working on. My fingers are crossed!
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rashystreakers:

Working on a new axe:
I made a couple new tools today and tried a couple new method for making this axe. My post earlier showed the tool for the back spike. Now I want to show you a tool I welded together this evening to help me hammer the under curve into the axe head. 
Hot axe.
Welded large round steel bar chunk to angle iron to make a hardy tool. The welds aren’t great but for me they are getting much better. I think I went through a good 10 sticks to make this piece.
Here is the new form positioned on the anvil. I made it double sided with two different sized pieces so I can just flip it and work the next radius.
A shot of the axe after using the smaller radius for a few heats. This steel I’m using is super tough and I have to forge it super hot. Does not move very quickly.
Starting to slot punch the eye hole. I think I probably had to heat this six times to get this punch through 2 cm of steel. That might give you a clue as to how hard this is.
Here is a shot of the axe as I left it tonight. Slotted and I started to fan out the blade a little. The edge is still a good cm thick. Tomorrow I will make the under arch a little bigger and start to spread the length back out before I drift the eye.
You can see the tool I use to slot cut a hole in the top. First I hammer like hell on that thing till it sinks almost all the way through. next I flip it and line up the punch while the piece cools a little, dark red to grey works well. Then I blast the punch back through really quick and it shears off a little slice inside (see that slug in between the axe and punch). It’s a super cool process and beats the pants off of drilling and filing. It also leaves more steel than drilling.
The plan is to have this mostly done by this time tomorrow. 
rashystreakers:

Working on a new axe:
I made a couple new tools today and tried a couple new method for making this axe. My post earlier showed the tool for the back spike. Now I want to show you a tool I welded together this evening to help me hammer the under curve into the axe head. 
Hot axe.
Welded large round steel bar chunk to angle iron to make a hardy tool. The welds aren’t great but for me they are getting much better. I think I went through a good 10 sticks to make this piece.
Here is the new form positioned on the anvil. I made it double sided with two different sized pieces so I can just flip it and work the next radius.
A shot of the axe after using the smaller radius for a few heats. This steel I’m using is super tough and I have to forge it super hot. Does not move very quickly.
Starting to slot punch the eye hole. I think I probably had to heat this six times to get this punch through 2 cm of steel. That might give you a clue as to how hard this is.
Here is a shot of the axe as I left it tonight. Slotted and I started to fan out the blade a little. The edge is still a good cm thick. Tomorrow I will make the under arch a little bigger and start to spread the length back out before I drift the eye.
You can see the tool I use to slot cut a hole in the top. First I hammer like hell on that thing till it sinks almost all the way through. next I flip it and line up the punch while the piece cools a little, dark red to grey works well. Then I blast the punch back through really quick and it shears off a little slice inside (see that slug in between the axe and punch). It’s a super cool process and beats the pants off of drilling and filing. It also leaves more steel than drilling.
The plan is to have this mostly done by this time tomorrow. 
rashystreakers:

Working on a new axe:
I made a couple new tools today and tried a couple new method for making this axe. My post earlier showed the tool for the back spike. Now I want to show you a tool I welded together this evening to help me hammer the under curve into the axe head. 
Hot axe.
Welded large round steel bar chunk to angle iron to make a hardy tool. The welds aren’t great but for me they are getting much better. I think I went through a good 10 sticks to make this piece.
Here is the new form positioned on the anvil. I made it double sided with two different sized pieces so I can just flip it and work the next radius.
A shot of the axe after using the smaller radius for a few heats. This steel I’m using is super tough and I have to forge it super hot. Does not move very quickly.
Starting to slot punch the eye hole. I think I probably had to heat this six times to get this punch through 2 cm of steel. That might give you a clue as to how hard this is.
Here is a shot of the axe as I left it tonight. Slotted and I started to fan out the blade a little. The edge is still a good cm thick. Tomorrow I will make the under arch a little bigger and start to spread the length back out before I drift the eye.
You can see the tool I use to slot cut a hole in the top. First I hammer like hell on that thing till it sinks almost all the way through. next I flip it and line up the punch while the piece cools a little, dark red to grey works well. Then I blast the punch back through really quick and it shears off a little slice inside (see that slug in between the axe and punch). It’s a super cool process and beats the pants off of drilling and filing. It also leaves more steel than drilling.
The plan is to have this mostly done by this time tomorrow. 
rashystreakers:

Working on a new axe:
I made a couple new tools today and tried a couple new method for making this axe. My post earlier showed the tool for the back spike. Now I want to show you a tool I welded together this evening to help me hammer the under curve into the axe head. 
Hot axe.
Welded large round steel bar chunk to angle iron to make a hardy tool. The welds aren’t great but for me they are getting much better. I think I went through a good 10 sticks to make this piece.
Here is the new form positioned on the anvil. I made it double sided with two different sized pieces so I can just flip it and work the next radius.
A shot of the axe after using the smaller radius for a few heats. This steel I’m using is super tough and I have to forge it super hot. Does not move very quickly.
Starting to slot punch the eye hole. I think I probably had to heat this six times to get this punch through 2 cm of steel. That might give you a clue as to how hard this is.
Here is a shot of the axe as I left it tonight. Slotted and I started to fan out the blade a little. The edge is still a good cm thick. Tomorrow I will make the under arch a little bigger and start to spread the length back out before I drift the eye.
You can see the tool I use to slot cut a hole in the top. First I hammer like hell on that thing till it sinks almost all the way through. next I flip it and line up the punch while the piece cools a little, dark red to grey works well. Then I blast the punch back through really quick and it shears off a little slice inside (see that slug in between the axe and punch). It’s a super cool process and beats the pants off of drilling and filing. It also leaves more steel than drilling.
The plan is to have this mostly done by this time tomorrow. 
rashystreakers:

Working on a new axe:
I made a couple new tools today and tried a couple new method for making this axe. My post earlier showed the tool for the back spike. Now I want to show you a tool I welded together this evening to help me hammer the under curve into the axe head. 
Hot axe.
Welded large round steel bar chunk to angle iron to make a hardy tool. The welds aren’t great but for me they are getting much better. I think I went through a good 10 sticks to make this piece.
Here is the new form positioned on the anvil. I made it double sided with two different sized pieces so I can just flip it and work the next radius.
A shot of the axe after using the smaller radius for a few heats. This steel I’m using is super tough and I have to forge it super hot. Does not move very quickly.
Starting to slot punch the eye hole. I think I probably had to heat this six times to get this punch through 2 cm of steel. That might give you a clue as to how hard this is.
Here is a shot of the axe as I left it tonight. Slotted and I started to fan out the blade a little. The edge is still a good cm thick. Tomorrow I will make the under arch a little bigger and start to spread the length back out before I drift the eye.
You can see the tool I use to slot cut a hole in the top. First I hammer like hell on that thing till it sinks almost all the way through. next I flip it and line up the punch while the piece cools a little, dark red to grey works well. Then I blast the punch back through really quick and it shears off a little slice inside (see that slug in between the axe and punch). It’s a super cool process and beats the pants off of drilling and filing. It also leaves more steel than drilling.
The plan is to have this mostly done by this time tomorrow. 
rashystreakers:

Working on a new axe:
I made a couple new tools today and tried a couple new method for making this axe. My post earlier showed the tool for the back spike. Now I want to show you a tool I welded together this evening to help me hammer the under curve into the axe head. 
Hot axe.
Welded large round steel bar chunk to angle iron to make a hardy tool. The welds aren’t great but for me they are getting much better. I think I went through a good 10 sticks to make this piece.
Here is the new form positioned on the anvil. I made it double sided with two different sized pieces so I can just flip it and work the next radius.
A shot of the axe after using the smaller radius for a few heats. This steel I’m using is super tough and I have to forge it super hot. Does not move very quickly.
Starting to slot punch the eye hole. I think I probably had to heat this six times to get this punch through 2 cm of steel. That might give you a clue as to how hard this is.
Here is a shot of the axe as I left it tonight. Slotted and I started to fan out the blade a little. The edge is still a good cm thick. Tomorrow I will make the under arch a little bigger and start to spread the length back out before I drift the eye.
You can see the tool I use to slot cut a hole in the top. First I hammer like hell on that thing till it sinks almost all the way through. next I flip it and line up the punch while the piece cools a little, dark red to grey works well. Then I blast the punch back through really quick and it shears off a little slice inside (see that slug in between the axe and punch). It’s a super cool process and beats the pants off of drilling and filing. It also leaves more steel than drilling.
The plan is to have this mostly done by this time tomorrow. 
rashystreakers:

Working on a new axe:
I made a couple new tools today and tried a couple new method for making this axe. My post earlier showed the tool for the back spike. Now I want to show you a tool I welded together this evening to help me hammer the under curve into the axe head. 
Hot axe.
Welded large round steel bar chunk to angle iron to make a hardy tool. The welds aren’t great but for me they are getting much better. I think I went through a good 10 sticks to make this piece.
Here is the new form positioned on the anvil. I made it double sided with two different sized pieces so I can just flip it and work the next radius.
A shot of the axe after using the smaller radius for a few heats. This steel I’m using is super tough and I have to forge it super hot. Does not move very quickly.
Starting to slot punch the eye hole. I think I probably had to heat this six times to get this punch through 2 cm of steel. That might give you a clue as to how hard this is.
Here is a shot of the axe as I left it tonight. Slotted and I started to fan out the blade a little. The edge is still a good cm thick. Tomorrow I will make the under arch a little bigger and start to spread the length back out before I drift the eye.
You can see the tool I use to slot cut a hole in the top. First I hammer like hell on that thing till it sinks almost all the way through. next I flip it and line up the punch while the piece cools a little, dark red to grey works well. Then I blast the punch back through really quick and it shears off a little slice inside (see that slug in between the axe and punch). It’s a super cool process and beats the pants off of drilling and filing. It also leaves more steel than drilling.
The plan is to have this mostly done by this time tomorrow. 
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asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope
asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope
asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope
asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope
asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope
asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope
asylum-art:

 Renaissance Metal Art - Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Etching, derived from an ancient Germanic word for ‘eat’, uses corrosive acids to bite designs into hard surfaces like metal. The background can either be eaten away so the design stands out in relief, or the design itself can be bitten into the surface. The technique creates a shallow relief making it possible to create highly decorated objects without compromising the structural integrity of the metal making it suitable for items like weapons, locks and tool. Between 1500 and 1750 production centred on southern Germany and northern Italy where etched armour was a speciality.
Padlock and Key, c 1580 Southern Germany, Steel
Helmet (Morion), c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Gauntlet, c 1580 Northern Italy, Steel
Thigh Defence (Cuisse), c 1515-1525 Augsburg, Southern Germany – Steel
Barrel-Maker’s Knife, 1702Germany – Steel, brass
Casket, c 1570-1600 Germany, Steelcartwork.
Cranequin, c 1565-1574 Southern Germany, Steel-wood-rope
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cjforge:

Mutha f’n snakes on a mutha f’n anvil…www.facebook.com/CJForgeBlacksmith #blacksmith #forged #SamuelL.
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doyoulikevintage:

Blacksmith Shop